Monday, April 22, 2013

Sanjay Dutt Trial

It has been two decades since a series of 13 bomb blasts rocked Mumbai. On 19 April 1993 Sanjay Dutt was convicted for illegal possession arms, under the Terrorist and Disruptive Activities Act (TADA).
 
He spent 18 months in jail until he was granted bail in October 1995. In 2006 the case opened for sentencing of all accused, Dutt was finally acquitted of any TADA-related offenses but was charged under the illegal possession of arms act. On 21 March 2013, The Supreme Court upheld the conviction of actor to serve jail for 5 years.
 
Reactions flooded from all parts of the country. Some were shocked; some were in favour of conviction. Politicians, media, film industry, fans all joined in to form their respective opinions. Press Council of India chief Justice Markandey Katju has appealed to Maharashtra Governor Sankarnarayanan to pardon the actor.
 
THE DEBATE IS, SHOULD SANJAY DUTT BE PARDONED?
 
I would like to put my point of view forward. Irrespective of whether I am a fan of Sanjay Dutt or not, I feel he must NOT be pardoned for this crime. By feeling "sorry" for Sanjay Dutt I think we are just ignoring the gravity of charges against him. He confessed to have acquired arms from Anees Ibrahim, the younger brother of Dawood Ibrahim. The police claimed that several phone records showed that Sanjay Dutt was in constant touch with Anees, even making calls to Anees's number at White House Dubai.
 
There are many Political and film fraternity supporters of Sanjay Dutt, however not a single voice came in support for 75-years-old ZaibunnisaQazi, who is also sentenced for five years for keeping the weapons.
 
Also we fail to understand that whatever he performs in his films is his reel life. We can appreciate his performances but cannot draw an analogy between his reel and real life. Basically the problem is, people are relating his larger than life role in 'Munnabhai MBBS' to his real life. If that's the case, he also played villainous roles in Khalnayak, Vaastav, Agneepath and so on... doesn't make sense to relate, right?.
 
Also, they say he has suffered a lot during these 20 years and in a way it was a punishment for him that the trial took so many years of his life. There are many convicts who have undergone the same, several who were waiting for their chance to come. If Sanjany Dutt has a family to look after, everybody else has, except for the fact others may not have the financial and political backing.
 
I am not saying he should be given an extraordinary punishment, but a punishment which a common man would have got for this crime.
 
PS : The views in this post belongs completely to me. You can say it’s just "THE WAY I SEE IT".